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What are the penalties of stalking in Nevada?

Like many other laws, the definitions and penalties related to stalking vary by state. Nevada has clearly defined statutes which protect victims of stalking, and this applies whether or not the victim knows the perpetrator. A person is considered to be guilty of stalking in Nevada if they maliciously or willfully act in a way that harasses, intimidates, frightens or terrorizes a reasonable person. Additionally, if a victim fears a household member or a family member due to this behavior, it is also considered stalking.

There are other definitions of stalking in Nevada law, and each definition carries different penalties. In most situations, a first offense is considered a misdemeanor. Any subsequent conviction, however, would result in a charge at the level of gross misdemeanor.

If an individual engages in the act of stalking while simultaneously causing an individual to fear that they may suffer serious bodily harm, the stalker can be charged with aggravated stalking. This crime is considered a Category-B felony, and it can result in a two- to 15-year prison sentence. Additionally, the perpetrator can also be fined up to $5,000.

With the constant advent of new internet technology, stalking has gone digital. Someone who uses the internet to commit stalking, which includes posting information that puts another individual at an increased risk of harm, can be labeled as a Category-C felony. Also, any of these stalking charges can be in conjunction with additional charges related to the criminal behavior.

Stalking can present a dangerous environment for a victim, but an attorney can sometimes help in these situations. If an individual is placing another in reasonable fear, an attorney may be able to provide legal outlets and guidance to stop the hostile behavior.

Source: Womens' Law.org, "200.575 Stalking: Definitions; penalties.", October 16, 2014

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